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Tips for Parents

Helping Your Child with the Recruiting Process

 

  • Be a support system. Let your child assume most of the responsibility, they are the ones who have to live with the choice. Be there to help discuss the pros and cons of various choices, e.g. urban vs. rural, large vs. small, public vs. private.
  • Help your child research the schools. Check on academic requirements, facts about the program, cost, etc. Don’t do all the work for them, but be the supportive parent and have key points to discuss with them.
  • Follow-up. Make sure that all of the applications have been filled out completely and sent in on time. This is imperative weather they receive golf scholarship aid or not, making sure the admissions process is complete is first….remember you are a student before athlete!
  • Monitor. If your child is continually receiving phone calls from coaches and concerned others, you may want to step in here. Young players may find it very disrupting and difficult to handle. Some coaches are notorious for frequent calling while others are extremely laid back. Big Suggestion: be there with your child when they are on the phone with the Coach. This will sometimes help ease their nerves and you can help answer questions as well. Coaches will not mind being on speaker phone to talk to the whole family.
  • Finances. You need to decide what sacrifices, if any, you are willing to make. Don’t pressure your child to go just for a scholarship if it is not necessary. Find out exactly what the scholarship will cover. Making sure this is known before the process really gets in gear, will ease an decision later in the process.
  • Interviews. Help your child prepare a list of questions, but let him/her ask questions during interviews. If there is a lull in the conversation you may want to help it along with questions that concern you. Don’t appear overconfident regarding academic or athletic ability.
  • Don’t panic. If by mid-April your child has not signed a National Letter of Intent, don’t worry. Most coaches are waiting to see which players will sign. There are schools with scholarships available sometimes through the summer.
  • Remember your key words: SUPPORT AND FOLLOW-UP.

[separator text=”About the Author”]

 

AnnDirector of College Placement, Ann Maness, has years of experience with the college athletics recruiting process. Ann is the second sibling in her family to join the elite college golf ranks and played for Coastal Carolina University, where she took no time to capture her first collegiate victory.

During her freshman year, Ann came from 6 shots behind in the final round of the Big South Conference Championship, firing a 68 to claim the individual conference title. To date, that 68 remains the single-round record for the Women’s Golf Big South Championship. Ann went on to capture two more singles titles at CCU.

She also participated in the 2009 NCAA Regionals, was a 4-Time Big South All-Conference Team Member, and was an 8-Time Big South Player of the Week.

You can contact Ann at Ann.Maness@juniorsports.com and follow her on Twitter at @DCP1AManess .

A Day in the Life of a Student-Athlete — Part 1

Rika Park, International Junior Golf Tour alum and current sophomore on the golf team at the University of Miami, has some very important things for students who are looking to participate in athletics in college.

  • It is important to meet with each professor every week. When we travel for tournaments, we miss multiple classes. It is very important for us to meet with the professor so that we do not get behind in our studies.

 

  • Freshman students will also have a mandatory 8 hours of study hall each week. These study hall times will be in the evenings after dinner. This study hall is not required for sophomores only if their GPA is high enough.

 

  • Utilize the resources around you to avoid getting bogged down with stress. The universities have programs for time management as well as tutors that you can use so you don’t get too far behind. Time management is the key to being a successful student athlete in college. You must have time management in order to succeed.

Rika Park

The hardest thing for many students is adjusting to new time constraints. Many students feel pressured as freshman because they have not prepared themselves to manage their time to meet deadlines that college classes and coaches request. Here are a few tips for students to begin to learn time management:

  • Make a routine and stick to it. Many students never learn this and end up struggling trying to do everything in one day. By creating a routine that you stick to each and every day you will be more productive, less stressed, and overall a more balanced student. One way to learn how to create and stick to a routine is to be specific. Make specific times and time frames that things must be accomplished in. This will not only help your routine, but will also help with setting goals for each day.
  • Set Priorities. By making a list of the things that must be accomplished in order of importance. This way you will not forget or leave off an important task that needs to be completed. Make a list of priorities at the beginning of the week and work on getting through that list by the end of the week.
  • Get organized! Many students do not get their classes, homework, dorm room or schedules organized. By making sure everything is in its place every day, you give yourself the best chance at not losing important documents or things that you need for the day. One of the best organization tools to use is a calendar. Mark down all the important dates (test dates, meetings, projects, golf tournaments) on one calendar. This will help keep all dates organized.
  • Avoid procrastinating. Many times, we use procrastination on big projects or tasks because they seem overwhelming or boring. Break the project into multiple, small, achievable goals or steps. This will help keep the mind focused on the task at hand instead of worrying about the project as a whole. Also try to reward yourself for completing each small step.
  • Avoid multitasking if possible. When you multitask, you lose focus on the projects that you working on. Confusion will ensue and organization will be thrown out the window. Instead, focus on only one task at a time. This will ensure that each and every project is completed correctly the first time instead of getting lost in the confusion of trying to complete multiple projects.
  • Remember, even people who have become time management experts have days where they cannot catch up and their schedules get messed up. Do not give up on learning how to manage your time because this is one of the essential skills in life that you will use every single day.

AnnDirector of College Placement, Ann Maness, has years of experience with the college athletics recruiting process. Ann is the second sibling in her family to join the elite college golf ranks and played for Coastal Carolina University, where she took no time to capture her first collegiate victory.

During her freshman year, Ann came from 6 shots behind in the final round of the Big South Conference Championship, firing a 68 to claim the individual conference title. To date, that 68 remains the single-round record for the Women’s Golf Big South Championship. Ann went on to capture two more singles titles at CCU.

She also participated in the 2009 NCAA Regionals, was a 4-Time Big South All-Conference Team Member, and was an 8-Time Big South Player of the Week.

You can contact Ann at Ann.Maness@juniorsports.com and follow her on Twitter at @DCP1AManess.

Getting Recruited

 

Three Easy Steps to Getting Recruited

Step 1: Commitment – The recruiting process isn’t something you just breeze through. If you are seriously interested in finding a scholarship opportunity to play college golf, you have to commit yourself to this goal. Athletes are working towards goals all the time, and there are hundreds of other high school athletes, just like you, who are out there trying to get recruited to the next level. That means you have to fully dedicate yourself to reaching this goal by getting organized, staying on top of communication with coaches, studying for the SAT/ACT and much more. If you are willing to pledge yourself to the recruiting process, you will be able to reach your ultimate goal and a place that fits you!

Step 2: Attitude – If you are going to get the attention of college coaches, you need to have the right attitude. Firstly, you must be proactive. No one else is going to get you recruited and if coaches aren’t recruiting you, then you need to take control! Take control of your recruiting and be responsible for accepting how the process works.

You can get help and support from services through our Director of College Placement, Ann Maness, but remember all the components that go into being recruited. You need to be mature and professional throughout the entire process. There’s a chance that not every coach you contact will be interested in you, actually…there’s a BIG chance. Guess what…that’s OK! It’s always important to be respectful and mature about their decision, and then move on to the next one. It will not do you any good to get upset at the coach and say things that might get you in trouble. Adopting a positive attitude will help you and your family through the process, and it will become a project, rather than a chore.

Step 3: Be Open – When it comes to the recruiting process, quantity is key. The more schools you consider, the more coaches you contact, and the more effort you put into it will all help generate better results. In order to have success in getting recruited, you need to leave your options open. If you are too specific in your school preference (example: only DI schools when you are not that caliber of a player) you will have fewer options that will be successful for you. While it is a great idea to know what you want in your school, you also have to make sure that you are not limiting yourself on possible opportunities. For example, if you know you want to major in accounting, you should definitely research each school’s accounting programs in order to make sure it would be a good fit with you and your academic goals. But the key is to make sure you explore schools in all division levels, as well as in several regions of the country. You never know what school may turn out to be a perfect fit if you don’t expand your horizons to see what’s out there!

[separator text=”About the Author”]

AnnDirector of College Placement, Ann Maness, has years of experience with the college athletics recruiting process. Ann is the second sibling in her family to join the elite college golf ranks and played for Coastal Carolina University, where she took no time to capture her first collegiate victory.

During her freshman year, Ann came from 6 shots behind in the final round of the Big South Conference Championship, firing a 68 to claim the individual conference title. To date, that 68 remains the single-round record for the Women’s Golf Big South Championship. Ann went on to capture two more singles titles at CCU.

She also participated in the 2009 NCAA Regionals, was a 4-Time Big South All-Conference Team Member, and was an 8-Time Big South Player of the Week.

You can contact Ann at Ann.Maness@juniorsports.com and follow her on Twitter at @DCP1AManess.

Narrowing Your Search

Can’t Decide Which Colleges to Contact?

A good way to narrow your search when beginning the college placement process is to make a list of potential Universities that interest you. This will help you eliminate schools that may not fit the characteristics that will help you achieve the goals for your golf career.

Here are some questions to ask when compiling this list:
Does the school offer the course work I want to take as a major in college?

  • Can I get a quality education there?
  • Is the college close enough or far enough away from home?
  • Can my athletic goals be achieved there?
  • If sports were not a factor, would I still want to get my education there?

Choosing a college requires plenty of preparation and investigation. These are just a few questions to ask when starting the process.  There is no such thing as being over prepared – after all, you are choosing the next four years of your life!

If you would like further help in researching college golf programs, contact IJGT Director of College Placement, Ann Maness.

[separator text=”About the Author”]

AnnDirector of College Placement, Ann Maness, has years of experience with the college athletics recruiting process. Ann is the second sibling in her family to join the elite college golf ranks and played for Coastal Carolina University, where she took no time to capture her first collegiate victory.

During her freshman year, Ann came from 6 shots behind in the final round of the Big South Conference Championship, firing a 68 to claim the individual conference title. To date, that 68 remains the single-round record for the Women’s Golf Big South Championship. Ann went on to capture two more singles titles at CCU.

She also participated in the 2009 NCAA Regionals, was a 4-Time Big South All-Conference Team Member, and was an 8-Time Big South Player of the Week.

You can contact Ann at Ann.Maness@juniorsports.com and follow her on Twitter at @DCP1AManess.